Category Archives: Events

Judged Response

One afternoon, whilst speaking to my closest friend Errin Yesilkaya, we wanted to do something. Just something. An exhibition sprung to mind, then I must have stammered shortly after this revelation. There we have it. Judged Response, an exhibition which places explicit focus on stammering, celebrating the differences of those people who stammer, demonstrating these differences and challenges through the medium of art, which has no boundaries, as you are not bound by what you can utter. The visual nature of the artistic medium allows for freedom of expression which people who stammer may struggle with otherwise. This was our idea and vision.

Errin and I brought Shahram Saadat on board as a person who stammers. After many meetings, we decided on our idea and proposed this to Arts SU, the Student Union of University of the Arts London where we all study BA (Hons) Photography at London College of Communication (LCC). We were successful in gaining an exhibition space at LCC, thus then our creation and curation of the exhibition began.

Our motivation for this stammering and art fusion was primarily the fact that stammering has not as such been greatly presented in an artistic context. This exhibition would be an accessible way for anyone, someone who stammers, someone who has knowledge of stammering, or ideally, no knowledge at all of the complexities of stammering to engage with the day-to-day struggle of speech. Ideally, this exhibition would be as public as possible, detached from the white space of the gallery and firmly placed within the public domain for maximum impact and a realisation from the public that stammering is a challenge and not something to be mimicked, laughed at or perceived as a weakness.

Audience and raising awareness was a key reason for us curating an exhibition of this nature. Stammering is something which is talked about, however, while it is talked about, it is not an easy subject to be public about due to the sensitivities of the subject matter, the differing views and effects it has on people who stammer, so any kind of public exposure of stammering has to be carefully, ethically thought through. Art, to some extent, has no limits, it is the artist’s personal perspective, not those of an organisation, so it has the potential to accurately represent (particularly if the artist stammers) the insecurities, strengths, niggles, that stammering brings up.

The three of us each exhibited a work of our own (I was the odd one out, presenting two), all communicating varying themes and aspects of the nature of stammering. Errin’s piece, £137.80, speaks for the way in which our consumerist culture may view people who identify themselves as having a disability are viewed within society. Shahram’s piece, Appropriated Reactions, focuses in on the facial expressions a person who stammers may experience when speaking with someone. My works, Subtitled Liberation and We Judge Because We Don’t Understand, through text in a physical and video sense, provides a liberating, anonymous, fluent opportunity for multiple people who stammer to express their true emotions about the struggle of having a stammer.

The Private View was extremely well attended by people who stammer, friends of those who stammer and people with no connection to stammering at all. Pertinent and important discussions were also held over an exciting, engaging Q&A session with the exhibitors plus Claire Norman, Founder of the Stammerers Through University Campaign (www.stuc-uk.org) and Tim Fell, Chair, British Stammering Association. Overwhelmingly, the most common phrase uttered to me during the night was ‘this is the start of something’ or similarly ‘you’re onto something’. Of which, I agreed with everyone who said this to me. This is the mission I’m on, to show the connection between stammering and art, through a number of mediums, to ultimately affect public opinion.

We are keen, as a collective, to develop a more ambitious exhibition, extending on the ideas raised in Judged Response, perhaps being more interactive and immersive. Watch this space.

 

Rory Sheridan

e) photo@rorysheridan.co.uk
w) www.rorysheridan.co.uk

Stammering Pride & Prejudice, City Lit, 3rd Nov 2016

I must admit I arrived with a little apprehension, this was the first time I had attended a public event related to stammering. I was aware that I was wearing two hats, as a person who stammers and a psychologist who has a special interest in working with PWS.

The opening remarks by Mark Malcomson were warm and welcoming, there was a real sense of excitement in the room around exploring this novel and perhaps controversial way of viewing stammering. As a psychologist I’ve tended to think about how a person relates to their stammer and the psychological processes that may or may not help in living well with a stammer. Whilst I have an appreciation that the social world we live in will influence this, I had never fully considered that stammering as a problem can be viewed as a socially-constructed phenomenon and so I really was intrigued to learn more about the social model of stammering.

The first talk was by Prof Michael Boyle who is looking at how one might go about reducing stigma around stuttering. This was an interesting look at the stereotypes around stuttering and how these are reinforced in the media. Michael is clearly doing some great work looking at ways to influence public attitudes to stammering. One of the things presented in his research was how people sometimes associate stammering with anxiety and there was the idea that this is a negative stereotype that should be refuted, with stammering presented as something separate to anxiety. I was interested to find that this evoked an emotional reaction in me. As a psychologist, I was struck by the parallels in how PWS are stigmatised in many similar ways to people with mental health difficulties. We are consistently given messages about how we ‘should’ be… whether it be happy, calm or confident. Anything other than these desirable mind states are ‘wrong’ and need to ‘fixed’ or controlled. Those of us who don’t easily fit this, again whether it be disfluency, anxiety, lack of confidence, I could go on… are given the idea, even as children, that we must change this. This can lead to a sense of shame around  normal human experiences and emotions and presents a narrow and limited view of what it is ‘ok’ to be like. My concern with some of the ideas alluded to in Michael’s talk around anxiety as separate to stammering is that we risk reinforcing negative stereotypes around mental health and potentially invalidating the experience of the many PWS (me included) for whom stammering AND anxiety are intimately interrelated aspects of ourselves. Ultimately PWS will have a diverse range of experiences and personalities, so as a community let’s celebrate this diversity.

Next up was a hard-hitting and thought-provoking talk by Katy Bailey. Katy talked about how negative attitudes toward stammering is akin to a person without legs being denied a wheelchair. How we are constantly given the message that to be different is wrong or bad. She recounted her personal experience to highlight how the way that stammering is approached, even within the world of stammering research and therapy, can reinforce this ‘damaged’ narrative. Internalisation of these narratives leads to an internal struggle to control stammering. For me, Katy hit the nail on the head here! Social and cultural norms will tell us it’s wrong or bad when we don’t fit the mould, when you couple this with our problem-solving brains that tell us we should be able to control our internal experiences in the way we can our external world, we end up with the makings of a lifelong, futile struggle to control what can’t easily be controlled. Moreover, this struggle ultimately comes at the cost of pursuing a rich, and meaningful life. PWS often sacrifice important personal values and goals in an attempt to control or hide this part of themselves. These sacrifices or costs will come in small packages, a latte when you wanted a cappuccino, and really big packages, giving up on the dream of a particular career or vocation. Katy highlighted the role of acceptance or letting go of the struggle as a meaningful way forward for her in living with and coming to find meaning in her stammer. As a therapist who teaches acceptance-based therapies (namely Acceptance and Commitment Therapy or ACT) and someone for whom working to let go of these struggles has been so liberating and empowering, Katy’s talk really resonated with me. Moreover, it highlights the need for more work clinically and research on the potential role for acceptance-based therapies (which are gaining momentum in the world of psychology) in working with PWS. Here the move is away from control and towards willingness to experience uncomfortable feelings, such as stammering, in order to move toward values life goals. This theme of self-acceptance was echoed later in discussions between Chris Constantino, Josh St Pierre and Dori Holte, and in Walter Scott’s talk about how his stammering was approached in school.

The rest of day saw talks by Iain Wilkie on the wonderful work he is doing with the Employers Stammering Network (ESN). Iain talked about how it’s to everyone’s benefit if people who stammer can feel more comfortable and able to be open about their stammer at work. Even more, people who stammer bring particular strengths and value to an organisation.

Other highlights included Sam Simpson and Rachel Everard talking about how speech therapy might inadvertently reinforce unhelpful social norms, and the need for PWS to develop a positive, empowering collective identity to be able to ‘live choicefully’. This echoed the conspiracy of silence Iain referred to earlier in the day. Sam and Rachel’s talks brought up the need to educate SLTs in this complex interplay between social, psychological and physical factors that affect how people live with a stammer.

Some light relief from the hard-hitting stuff was provided by Patrick Campbell, Ian Hickey and Nisar Bostan who entertained us with comedy and poetry. The day ended with a bang with Ian leading a reading from an excerpt from one of King George VI speeches. Anyone in the audience who was, as Ian beautifully put it , ‘lucky enough to stammer’ was invited to join in. Such a moving end to the day and truly put meaning to the idea of pride in stammering.

I’m so grateful I was able to be part of this day, I feel sure that these ideas are the start of something really important in changing and challenging how we conceptualise stammering both for PWS and crucially for the therapists working with them. Sam said it when she said PWS are best placed to challenge the status quo, from the inside AND I know therapists can play such a powerful role in empowering people to find the courage required to do this work. Let’s get to work!

 

Lorraine Maher-Edwards
Email: lorraine_maher@yahoo.co.uk
Twitter: @LorraineEdwar

 

International Stammering Awareness Day 2014: My Shout!

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Raising public awareness is rife these days. There seem to be colourful wrist bands and ribbons for almost every health and social issue you can think of, and stammering is no exception. Today, on International Stammering Awareness Day, you can mark the occasion by sporting a unique sea-green version. It may be a small gesture, but it’s a positive step in the right direction:

We need more awareness around stammering!

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This is true for all people who stammer, but it feels especially relevant for people who have interiorised stammers, like me. I like to think of interiorised stammering as the invisible twin of overt stammering. People with interiorised stammers are able to maintain a near-perfect fluent façade by skirting around difficult sounds and words, and avoiding certain social situations altogether. But while they may appear to speak ‘normally’, this comes at a huge mental and emotional cost. Internally, they are struggling with all the thoughts and emotions that come with having a stammer. Anxiety, fear, frustration, shame, helplessness, loneliness – these are just a handful of those emotions. And they are underpinned by a flood of negative thoughts, such as ‘People won’t accept me if they find out that I stammer’, ‘I need to be fluent to do my job well’, and ‘Stammering means that I’ve failed’.

It’s difficult for people to understand that someone can have a stammer without actually stammering. I remember confiding in an old friend many years ago that I stammer. Her response was both rewarding and devastating: “But you speak perfectly fluently.” I was elated to hear that I had successfully pulled off normal speech, but at the same time it felt very lonely to know that this meant I would receive none of the support and understanding I really needed.

I believe this lack of awareness of interiorised stammering comes in part from an overly simple portrayal of stammering in the media. The King’s Speech – a film that shone a powerful light on stammering – profiles the struggles of someone with an overt stammer. And more recently, Musharaf, from the TV programme, Educating Yorkshire, captured the nation’s attention as a boy with a severe stammer fighting to be heard in a fluent world. While difficulty with speech is a hallmark of all types of stammering, interiorised stammering challenges the perception that this difficulty is immediately apparent. It shows that stammering is actually a very varied condition, and that there is so much more to having a stammer than just talking differently.

International Stammering Awareness Day is a wonderful opportunity for us to raise awareness of these, and other, aspects of stammering. Whether it’s talking about our experiences with others, wearing a wristband or a ribbon, running a marathon, or writing a blog post (!), every effort to improve the public insight into stammering will lead to a better understanding of this condition. I look forward to the day when I can tell someone that I stammer and they nod unquestioningly.

Cara

Reflections on my first BSA Conference: inspiration, connection, courage and community

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A week later and I am still feeling buoyed up by the positivity of the British Stammering Association’s National 2014 Conference, held in association with the Scottish Stammering Network in Glasgow. I was not sure what to expect as I made the long train journey north on Friday 22nd August, arriving just in time to attend the City Hall drinks – a grand and fitting social event to mark the beginning of the conference.

Conversations flowed as readily as the wine – with old friendships quickly renewed and new friendships founded. I was struck by the warmth, energy and harmonious chatter as the evening progressed – and which set the tone for the rest of the weekend. People mixed and mingled freely at mealtimes, between presentations and late into the night. It soon became apparent that the social aspect was an integral part of the conference’s success for many of the delegates – as the early morning photos at George’s Square clearly testify!

Significant highlights for me included:

  • Iain Wilkie’s keynote on ‘Transforming Employability’. Drawing on research highlighting employers’ ignorance and misunderstanding of stammering, Iain outlined the evolution of Ernst and Young’s ‘Stammering Network’ since its inception in 2011, which led to the launch of the ‘Employers Stammering Network’ (ESN), a BSA supported initiative, in 2013. Combining personal and corporate narratives interspersed with thought-provoking quotations, Iain advocated a cultural shift towards diversity and inclusiveness underpinned by flexible support processes involving the shared commitment of both employers and employees. To this end he invited all present to open up dialogues about stammering at work in the understanding that ‘there is no courageous conversation without vulnerability’. More information can be found on the BSA website: www.stammering.org/help-information/professionals-and-business/businesses/unlocking-talent-employers-stammering-network
  • Co-presenting with Katy Bailey (www.free-speech.org.uk) on the relevance of the social model of disability for stammering and employment. Relocating the problem of stammering in society and offering participants a chance to identify the physical and attitudinal barriers experienced in the workplace enabled us to explore how prevailing norms, language and stereotypes can go unchallenged and become insidiously internalised. Practical ways of managing these oppressive external and internal barriers were then discussed. Here is our handout if you are interested in finding out more.
  • Dr Allan McGroarty’s reflections on ‘Dr Quack and his stammer cure: quick fixes, bogus treatments and charlatans’. An amusing and informative review on how to spot a ‘Quack’ following the growth of the Internet and social media. Allan concluded by reflecting on the important role that the stammering and professional communities need to play in questioning and challenging false claims about stammering therapy in the public domain.
  • RSM Jimmy Lang’s motivational speech on ‘Reaching the Top’. The sheer grit, determination and resilience that Jimmy has applied to progressing his career in the army are truly impressive. Furthermore, his willingness and commitment to using his experience and influence to benefit others has resulted in the Defence College of Health Education & Training (DCHET) joining the ESN and developing clearer systems and support processes for other military personnel who stammer. Jimmy’s personal story offered a direct and powerful challenge to the ‘why try?’ effect often reported in the research (Corrigan et al., 2009; Boyle, 2013) due to the internalisation of public stigma. Exposure to Jimmy’s encouraging and constructive ‘can do’ attitude was particularly timely for the student I sat next to, who was contemplating a career in speech and language therapy and questioning the implications having a stammer would have.
  • Convincing reports on the BSA impact at the AGM, with a persuasive video testimonial on the successful Facebook page, underscored the need for greater involvement in fundraising in order to safeguard the future of the BSA: “Ask not what the BSA can do for you, ask what you can do for the BSA!”
  • The Gala dinner at the spectacular Science Centre followed by a highly entertaining impromptu exploration of Glasgow’s nightlife.
  • Bob Adam’s and Trev Bradley’s dynamic, engaging and practical workshop on ‘staying safe on the streets’ – a salient reminder given the unfortunate mugging of one of the conference delegates in the early hours of Sunday morning.
  • The infamous ‘Open Mike’ session where delegates queued for the entire 90-minute session to speak out in front of the bigger group – many for the first time, some to share their conference reflections, others to signpost a helpful resource (e.g. the Opening Doors employment course run jointly by City Lit and the BSA) and one person to get some practice in before his daughter’s wedding later this year!

A heartfelt thank you to everyone who made the 2014 conference possible, especially David Lilburn and John Mann, and to everyone who came and contributed to such a lively and memorable weekend.

In the online feedback, I was set the task of capturing the essence of the conference in four words. They would have to be: inspiration, connection, courage and community.

The next BSA conference is scheduled for 2016 – I’d highly recommend making a note in your diary now!

Sam

Boyle, M. (2013) Assessment of stigma associated with stuttering: Development and evaluation of the Self-Stigma of Stuttering Scale (4S). Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 56, 1517-1529.

Corrigan P., Larson J. & Rusch N. (2009) Self-stigma and the “why-try” effect: impact on life goals and evidence-based practices. World Psychiatry, 8, 75-81.

 

 

Stammering and the social model of disability: challenge and opportunity

Where does the real problem of stammering lie?

How does society communicate its values and norms about fluency and how does this affect people who stammer?

How does the SLT tread the delicate path between helping their client manage their stammering more effectively (and increase ease of communication) without reinforcing unhelpful ideas about stammering (and fluency)?

These are just some of the questions Katy Bailey, Sam Simpson and I posed in a joint presentation to the Oxford Dysfluency Conference on 19 July 2014.

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At the presentation’s heart was a conviction we all share that the social model of disability has much to tell us – people who stammer, speech and language therapists, and wider society – about stammering, and how by working together we can challenge and overcome some of the stigma out there and self-oppression in here which can make life so difficult for those of us who stammer.

Katy began by tracing the origins and development of the social model in the disabled people’s movement which disputed the traditional medical conception of disability as the individual’s problem requiring impairment expertise, cure, therapy and care. Instead, the social model locates the ‘problem’ of disability in society: in the physical barriers, but also in the negative stereotypes and prejudices which can push disabled people to the margins of society, whilst upholding powerful notions of ‘normality’. The physical barrier of a voicemail which does not let me finish saying my name may be familiar to people who stammer, but far more insidious and interesting for me is the stigma around stammering which operates along psychological and emotional pathways, and is there, Katy argues, in the struggle of stammering itself.

Sam then recounted her own development as a speech and language therapist and the disturbing realisation that she was training within a tradition firmly underpinned by the medical model in which she, the ‘impairment expert’ was expected to ‘fix’ and restore the client to normality (fluency), without any awareness of the social norms and stigma the therapy was reinforcing. Times have moved on since then – Sam’s book which she co-edited with Carolyn Cheasman and Rachel Everard, Stammering Therapy from the Inside is evidence enough – but there is still plenty of stammering therapy for which fluency is the overriding preoccupation, and which fails to take the client’s voice into account, and to grasp the broader factors of self-identity, society and social stigma.

Finally, I assessed some of the cultural pressures we face: the performance-driven and perfectionist zeitgeist in which we live and the haunting and destructive appeal of the ‘fluency god’ which I am happy to say more and more people who stammer are starting to renounce. That certainly seems to be the impression I get from a range of blogs, podcasts and websites: StutterTalk, Stuttering is Cool, British Stammering Association, Free Speech, Diary of a Stutterer and the latest, Did I Stutter? project. If you haven’t done so already, check them out! The internet and social media has been a wonderful way of bringing people who stammer together, to share our stories, insights and experiences, and to provide some collective resistance to the powerful social norms which tell us either to keep quiet and get it fixed, or at least to keep up the façade of fluency. This is the good news. And the other piece of good news is that speech and language therapists also have an important part to play in helping people who stammer overcome these barriers. Approaches such as mindfulness and cognitive behaviour therapy enable us to look at our thoughts around stammering differently, and foster healthier and more self-accepting thoughts and behaviours. There is much good work to build on, and more opportunity to continue this conversation between therapists, clients and self-help groups on how we can all work together to help people who stammer on our ongoing journey from oppression to liberation.

St John Harris
website: www.free-speech.org.uk

email: stjohn.harris@free-speech.org.uk
twitter: @StJohnHarris

Collaboration

“Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress, and working together is success” Henry Ford

2014 marks intandem‘s 10-year anniversary. Throughout this time, collaboration has been at the heart of all our work – both with each other and with others. 2013 was a year of experiments and we worked hard to establish even more connections and links within and outside our professional groups, using a range of approaches. As a result our networks and those we have reached and influenced have increased considerably. Here are some highlights from 2013 and some aspirations for 2014…

Twitter: @_intandem
One of our new ventures in 2013 was setting up a twitter account. We have written over 100 tweets and now have over 70 followers – including clients, therapists, counsellors, researchers, organisations, charities, students, and projects. We are using twitter to let people know what we are up to as well as signposting other events and ideas. Twitter offers a different way of interacting with individuals and groups and one that we hope we are getting better at with practice. We are starting to build a community of collaborators, which we consider a positive way forward.

Blog: www.intandem.co.uk/blog
2013 also saw the start of our monthly blog. Together with a range of guest bloggers, we have been able to use this as a regular platform to share ideas, reflections and insights as well as to signpost projects. Topics have included: different group experiences, vulnerability, acceptance, community & celebration, supervision and last, but not least, the launch of Stammering Therapy from the Inside: New Perspectives on Working with Young People and Adults. We have had a very positive response to each blog post and look forward to welcoming a range of new collaborators throughout 2014. Watch this space!

Culture Club
Another new intandem project for 2013 involved setting up a group opportunity for people with experience of stroke, tumour, head injury or brain surgery who are interested in music, film, theatre, comedy and art (Read here for more information). This open group of men and women meet every two months in the comfort of a local hotel café. Feedback to date has been resoundingly positive with a shared enjoyment of events, new ideas, humour and support. We plan to continue with this group throughout 2014 – check out the dates on our website here.

Relationship Group
Working with young people with experience of brain injury, who want to develop new friendships and relationships, has brought intandem to experimenting with a new group. We are looking forward to collaborating with Flame Introductions, a personal introduction agency who specialise in supporting people with mild disabilities and who you may have seen on the TV programme The Undateables. Our first joint meeting will be in March. Do get in touch if you are interested, as we are keen to open this group up to others.

Stammering Open Space
This open group has gone from strength to strength over the course of 2013 and now has a well-established core membership. (Read here for more information). Again feedback has been highly positive with a shared appreciation of the support and challenge, lively debate and exchange of ideas that the group offers. 2014 dates can be found here.

Courses
In our continued attempt to raise the profile of supervision within the profession we ran regular RCSLT registered Supervision 1 & 2 courses in England and Wales throughout the year. 2013 also saw us collaborating with UCL to offer a bespoke supervision course for new graduates. We recognise the unique needs of those entering the profession in the current climate. Through the course, we aimed to equip the students with the knowledge and skills to reach out for good support and supervision throughout their careers. Our shared commitment to offering support and training to therapists, coaches and other healthcare professionals interested in developing their counselling skills, resulted in our running a number of training days across the year, both independently and in collaboration with the Personal Construct Psychology Association and City Lit. intandem was also involved in organising a day of talks at City Lit to mark the publication of ‘Stammering Therapy from the Inside’, as well as co-ordinating a local book launch. Our 2014 programme of courses can be found here. Do check out what is new and let us know if you are interested in taking part.

We have enjoyed a year of experimentation and collaboration. Thanks to everyone we have worked with and met along the way! Here’s to 2014 – as we reach out to new possibilities ahead.

Cathy & Sam
January 2014

Therapy in Waterstones

Behind most books lies a tangle of anxiety about perception, rejection and word-choice. So the laden shelves of Waterstones in Teddington seemed a perfect backdrop for the local launch of ‘Stammering Therapy from the Inside – New Perspectives on Working with Young People and Adults’. Like publishing, the event pulled together an array of knowledge, experiences and feelings into full public view: therapists, people who stammer, people who don’t stammer. To my left was a man who, like me, knew the authors through therapy. To my right was a father whose son stammers; he had dropped into the shop out of curiosity. Elsewhere in the audience was Norbert Lieckfeldt who for many years has campaigned as head of the British Stammering Association. Speech therapy, whether private or in groups, is so easily hushed away like an embarrassing medical operation. The King’s Speech helped slash the stigma and fuel media interest, but hearing Sam, Carolyn, Rachel and others talk publicly about the evolution of their work seemed to take this one step further – from screens and newspapers into real-life.

Over many years I have been inspired by all three
authors at various stages of therapy. This event was a
reminder that I have struggled to communicate to
others what this therapy has been all about. For all they know I’ve been star-jumping and balancing
marbles on my tongue, like Bertie under Lionel Logue’s instruction. I suspect they are unaware of the
emotional mechanics at play. It was provoking to hear two people talk publicly about their own therapy. As Yahoo’s head of retail, Dan Durling has to (in his own words) ‘talk a lot’. He had at first approached his intandem therapy with frustration, wanting not to ‘talk’ about his stammer but just get a cure. It had taken him some time to realise that his friends and colleagues actually cared much less about his imperfect speech than he did. This was an important step in his journey toward acceptance and modification.

Similarly Cara Steger, an amateur violinist, in a display of ‘therapy in action’, talked of her struggle with the passive-sounding idea of ‘acceptance’. By contrast Cara had been used to a physical struggle in trying to be fluent. She compared her speech to learning the violin. The initial controlling impulse is to grip the bow tightly, but with learning and hard work comes a realisation that a lighter touch produces a better sound from the instrument. That had felt similar to learning to work with, not against, her stammer. It is rare that I hear other people stammer, and ironically I find it difficult when I do. Dan and Cara were largely fluent as they spoke, but where they did stammer I felt initial frustration for them, before focusing on the content of what they were actually saying. I wondered if others went through a similar process, and I reflected this might be how people feel when I speak.

Stammering is complex, uncertain and serially misunderstood. There is much to be gained from opening up a traditionally internalized experience, against our media backdrop of polished fluency and rapid delivery. For communities, schools, employers or whoever else, perhaps poignant local events like this are the way to go.
Walter Scott

Living well with stuttering

To celebrate International Stuttering Awareness Day on Tuesday 22 October 2013, Selena Donaldson, speech and language therapist for The Fluency Network at The University of Auckland hosted an informative breakfast seminar. This seminar featured a pre-recorded question and answer session with Sam Simpson and Rachel Everard, two of the co-authors of ‘Stammering Therapy From the Inside’. This event marked the opening of The Fluency Network at The University of Auckland, New Zealand’s newest service for people who
stammer.

Sam and Rachel introduced the concept of ‘living well with stuttering’. They discussed the idea of therapy supporting living with stuttering in a more comfortable way and deconstructed the common misconception that stuttering is something that has to be ‘fixed’. Sam and Rachel acknowledged that there is a range of approaches to stuttering therapy, and that the therapy process parallels a journey, in which a person may try different things at different points in life. They emphasised the importance of being transparent with clients about the type of approach taken, and the theoretical base behind it. Rachel stated from her own personal experience of stammering that although there are useful fluency shaping techniques available, those techniques can be difficult to apply in practice, unless the person becomes more open and accepting of their stuttering.

During this seminar, Sam and Rachel also spoke of self-disclosure. They emphasised the importance of not viewing stuttering as something that needs to be hidden, and promoted the value of stuttering being acknowledged by family and friends. They also emphasised the speech and language therapists’ role in offering clients a flexible model of therapy to help clients on their journey towards self-acceptance. These were concepts I have recently explored with a client at the University of Auckland Fluency Network Clinic. My client was interested in fluency shaping and the freedom approach to stuttering as well. Self-disclosure proved to be a highly powerful tool for this client, who was initially apprehensive about self-advertising and voluntary stuttering due to his past negative experiences. Having independently decided to self-disclose in a group situation outside of the therapy environment, he reported the experience to have been positive, stating, “the stutter doesn’t define me”.

It was wonderful to hear from Sam and Rachel, across the world, on International Stuttering Awareness Day, and to open the University’s new service with their astute and holistic clinical reflections.

Irene Yap
Master of Speech Language Therapy (Practice), final year student
The University of Auckland

Kinship and worship

International Stammering Awareness Day, 22nd October 2013

Over the summer I went travelling throughout Vietnam – a wonderful country where I had the pleasure of meeting many warm, openhearted people, eager to share their fascinating history, rich cultural heritage and exquisite cuisine.

Throughout my travels, I was frequently moved by the important role ‘kinship’ plays in Vietnamese culture, evidenced in strong family values and a deep respect for the other. So very contrasting to the Western emphasis on individualism and personal gain.

I was also struck by how central the practice of ‘worship’ is to Vietnamese life regardless of religious denomination. I returned home inspired by these important principles of community and celebration; and deeply committed to integrating them more fully into my work.

Tuesday 22nd October 2013 is International Stammering Awareness Day: an ideal opportunity to unite the community of people who stammer in order to give voice to the lived experience of stammering and raise public awareness.

intandem will be marking the occasion in two ways this year:

  • The Fluency Network – I will be taking part in a question and answer session via teleconferencing to mark the official launch of The Fluency Network, a newly established adult stammering service attached to the University Of Auckland, New Zealand
  • Book launch at Waterstones Teddington – on Wednesday 23rd Oct we are co-ordinating a local book launch to mark the publication of ‘Stammering Therapy from the Inside – New Perspectives on Working with Young People and Adults’. Do come along and offer your support
    – Click here for details

Through these two events we hope to bring together people who stammer, their families and friends as well as therapists and other people with an interest in stammering in order to foster new connections, open up dialogues and establish greater collaboration at both local and international levels.

Through kinship and the gathering together of the stammering community, we hope to extend our thinking about stammering, to celebrate developments in stammering therapy and to signpost relevant services in the voluntary, educational and independent sectors.

‘Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much’
-Helen Keller

Sam

Book launch

Launching ‘Stammering Therapy from the Inside’
9th May 2013 at City Lit and the House of Commons

Over 120 people who stammer and speech and language therapists gathered at City Lit for a day of talks relating to some of the key themes from the book. Trudy Stewart kicked off with an inspiring personal analysis of the therapeutic relationship using the metaphor of a bridge to depict key variables that influence the unique structure and form of each alliance as well as the qualities that both architects (the client and therapist) bring to the construction process. St John Harris followed with a thought-provoking and eloquent exploration of the social model of disability using the film ‘The King’s Speech’ and his own experience of stammering and therapy to illustrate (click here to read). Finally, Carolyn Desforges and Richard Seals concluded the morning with a passionate demonstration of the value of therapist/client collaboration in maintaining a specialist stammering service within the current NHS.

After lunch, Carolyn Cheasman briefly spoke about the genesis of the book and some of her own personal highs and lows during the editorial process; and I was able to pay tribute to the many therapists and clients, both present and absent, who have influenced my professional development, fuelled my interest in stammering and inspired my philosophy of therapy. Next, the Right Honourable Ed Balls, who contributed to a chapter in the book, gave a candid and humorous account of his experience of therapy and the process of ‘coming out’ as a person who stammers in the public eye. A personal reflection by Willie Botterill followed, highlighting the key influences that have shaped her approach to therapy and career. Finally Katy Bailey brought the talks to a close with a frank exploration of some of the challenges and intrinsic contradictions of stammering therapy that aims to promote fluency and acceptance of stammering (click here to read). Following Walt Manning’s summing up, this inspiring day ended with a reception at the House of Commons to launch both the book and the Employers Stammering Network.

Here are some photographic highlights:

Book launch
Myself, Dan Durling, Ed Balls and Jan Logan celebrating our co-authorship of the chapter on 1:1 therapy at City Lit
Co-editors Carolyn Cheasman, Rachel Everard and myself with City Lit Principal and Chief Executive, Mark Malcomson at the House of Commons
dusk

What a truly momentous day!

Sam

The House of Commons at dusk