Tag Archives: Experimentation

The Day after International Stammering Awareness Day (ISAD)

kite-007Disclosing one’s stammer is easy they say… vital I say. In fact it is very much a technique I subscribe to, use frequently and encourage others to try. Imagine going into a stressful situation, an interview for example; walk through the door, friendly handshake, introductions gone well, half way through the first question, BLOCK. No sound. Embarrassed interviewers. Red faces, yours and theirs. You get the word out, will I block again? Will I stammer? Oh please get me out of here. It feels like a total failure, even though it probably isn’t. Your mind is going through all the usual worst case scenarios.

Now, try this for size. Walk through the door, friendly handshake, introductions gone well. “Before we start I would just like to say, I occasionally stammer. It’s not a problem for me and I trust it won’t be for you.” Now you are in control, you have wowed them, you have a USP. If you do block or stammer, it’s not a surprise, there will be no embarrassment, your stress levels are normal for an interview, and you’re likely to be more fluent as a result.

Early self disclosure works in many situations; with new people, those dreaded round the table introductions at meetings and even presentations and speeches. Whatever the occasion, it puts those of us who stammer in control of our speech, something we crave but may rarely experience.

So why is it then that I, someone who has lots of experience and success using this technique, finds it so difficult to talk about my stammer with my family, friends and colleagues? They already know I stammer, a fact I have never wanted or been able to hide, so self disclosure with them would be something slightly different. I know I would not suffer prejudice or ridicule, these are my friends after all, and rightly or wrongly I do crack a joke about stammering, so they know I am in a comfortable place with my speech.

Is it because I would have to speak more about feelings rather than the mechanics of speech? Is it because I would be revealing a more vulnerable side to my character they may not have seen, wish to see or I may wish to reveal? Is it because I don’t like talking about me me me? Am I, as usual, over-thinking the whole situation and should I just get on and talk to them about how stammering has and continues to shape me into the person I am?

These are questions I do not yet have answers to, but writing this has motivated me to move my self disclosure onto the next level, more personal, closer to home. I have always been sceptical of ‘awareness days’, there is a risk those not directly affected will be jolted for 1/365th of a year, then move on to the next cause. Don’t get me wrong, I fully support ISAD and the freedom it gives stammerers to speak out, often for the first time, and long may it continue. As with every British Stammering Association Conference I have attended, we must, must ride the wave of positivity and ‘can do’ generated and continue the work started on that day or weekend.

For me, that means talking to my friends, workmates and anyone else who knows me (sounds like I am on the radio!) about stammering, educating them and doing my bit towards a society that accepts dis-fluency and not expects fluency.

When I was a child I used to enjoy spending time on the beach flying kites; brightly coloured, bold symbols of fun and freedom, only just under control but high in the sky for all around to see. I will be flying the kite for stammering from now on, when will you be flying yours?

paul-roberts-photo

 

Paul Roberts

There is always an alternative!

letitgobyleunigYou could call me a supervision junkie. I love it! I always have. To be honest I find it hard to understand those who don’t feel the need for it as for me it is like oxygen. It is one of life’s essentials. Essentially it keeps me, a speech and language therapist of nearly 25 years (very scary!!), breathing deeply and steadily, in the demanding and often surprisingly formidable and sometimes treacherous environments of schools of South London and Surrey. I know that if I did not have regular supervision, I would not have the stamina to continue to be fit to practice and I would have choked under the heavy pollutants of managing unrealistic expectations and negotiating the smoke screens and barriers to providing the best care for my clients. Supervision in all its forms – 1:1 with a supervisor for overview of my work; peer supervision with someone working with a similar client group; group supervision in a wider geographical area; occasional supervision with a specialist in a specific field – I access all and need each.

Supervision is like a filter, it gives an opportunity to sort out the stuff that needs sorting and provides a cleaner, more concentrated view of the contents. Over recent years, I’ve been on the two supervision courses by intandem on “Being Supervised” and “Being a Supervisor”. I have attended a practical course on Personal Construct Psychology (PCP) (Kelly) to improve my problem solving and questioning. Through the Counselling CEN, I’ve attended a Brief Solution Focussed Therapy course and have learnt a lot about active listening by being a member of an Action Learning Set. All of these opportunities have provided me with tools for ‘filtering’ my clinical and supervision work, so that I have a way of looking at things with clarity and with new ideas distilling through from the process.

Here are the top 5 ‘gems’ which I have learnt so far that help me in my role as a supervisor and as a person needing supervision:

  • There is always an alternative way of doing things (Kelly, PCP)
  • If someone has a problem, ask them what they think could help. It is often easy to forget to do this! (Kelly, PCP)
  • Supervision comes in lots of forms, but the 1:1 face-to-face session is the most powerful. To be listened to, properly, without interruption and with the full attention of another person, allows the person being listened to, to think more clearly than you would ever expect. Give this to your supervisees and clients and they will be very grateful. (Action Learning)
  • We are what we do! Always find out what sort of supervision history people have had in the past and what they have done. Asking them to draw a timeline of this can be very useful. (intandem courses)
  • “What else?” This is a very useful question to ask and opens up a million and one possibilities that might not have come to mind if the question had not been posed (Brief Solution Focussed Therapy)

Final thought: No one likes to be told what to do. Supervision should not be about being told what to do. It can be a very rich and fertile opportunity to grow and be nurtured and do things a different way. I challenge you to give it a try.

Ann-M Farquhar

B App Sc (Speech Pathology), MSc (Human Communication)

Speech and Language Therapist in Independent Practice

Interests in: Language Disorder, Social Communication and Supervision of Speech and Language Therapy Colleagues.

See my YouTube     https://youtu.be/5rZwG7IAzhg

 

Supervision at the fork in the road

image1We all start out with dreams and ideas about how our careers will go. It’s hard to foresee when, where or why the forks in the road will come, but it is almost certain that they will. This blog post explores two key ways in which supervision helped me to negotiate a fork in the path, keep hold of my dreams and step into independent practice.

Seventeen years ago, I embarked on a career in Speech and Language Therapy, with a dream to become a neuro rehab therapist. In the early stages of my career I was fortunate to have some great supervisors (also my managers), who nurtured my enthusiasm for neuro rehab.

In 2008, I took a senior post in a small department without access to clinical supervision within the organisation. I was holding a complex caseload, but for the first time also dealing with wider departmental and organisational issues. I felt the need for external supervision to develop my practice and take care of myself as I entered a more challenging stage of my career.

My line manager continued to oversee my work in post, particularly supporting my CPD, and helping me develop the SLT department. The separation of my clinical supervision to another time and place enabled me to attend to the needs of my clients, as well as my own needs, within this increasingly challenging work context. Through external clinical supervision, I had the freedom to reflect on the needs of my clients more deeply and my own journey more broadly.

Hawkins and Shohet (2007) discuss self-care as an important aspect of clinical supervision. Drawing an analogy between the ‘good enough helping professional ‘ and Donald Winnacott’s concept of the ‘good enough mother’. The ‘good enough mother’ may struggle to cope with the rigours of motherhood without the help and support of another adult, just as the helping professional may struggle to cope without the support of a supervisor. At this point in my career, I was faced daily with the devastating reality of people’s lives following brain injury. I was starting to develop quite strong ideas about addressing these needs with clients but also felt frustrated by the difficulties of achieving gains for my clients. I could easily have been worn down by these frustrations, but with wise and meaningful supervision, these difficult experiences ‘….. were survived, reflected upon and learnt from’ (Hawkins and Shohet, 2007). Through supervision, I became much more conscious of my concern to address my client’s ability to participate in their chosen life roles and started to think about how I could facilitate this for them.

It was at this time that my own personal circumstances changed. With a young family I was keen to be as present at home as much as possible without completely losing connection with my profession. I started to explore how to manage this change in my life and find a way to continue working within my chosen specialism.

Cathy and Sam have written about the changing role of supervision which ‘….. has now extended to one that supports and facilitates emotional resilience, opens up possibilities where there seem to be very few and fosters an individual’s personal/ professional resources to manage change’ (Bulletin, February 2013).

With this changing picture, refined by my professional interest and constrained by my personal circumstances, my supervisor helped me to consider diverse options as I stood at this fork in the road. I don’t remember who initiated the idea of independent practice, but I know that this path seemed daunting, much less travelled and insecure. I didn’t know how to begin walking away from the security of paid employment.

The supervisory relationship was a place of safety that allowed me to: test out ideas, evaluate the pros and cons of working independently, make plans and connections, review early steps and ask silly questions. I saw my first independent client in 2009, nearly six years ago. The transition to independent practice has been necessarily slow as I have been at home with my family, but this has brought with it opportunity to reflect on each small step in supervision and build slowly in confidence. With my supervisor’s support this process has been much smoother and more satisfying than it might have been as early ideas have come to fruition.

Work is not how I envisaged it seventeen years ago, but it does really work for me in the context of my life now. However, I could so easily have missed this path if I had not been able to access great supervision at the fork in the road.

Mary Ganpatsingh
www.communicationchanges.co.uk
@Comm_Changes

References
Supervision in the Helping Professions, 3rd edition (2007), Hawkins, P. and Shohet, R.
Supporting robust supervision practice, Sparkes, C. and Simpson, S. (February, 2013) Bulletin

Putting the Relationship in Supervision

images-9Supervision. The word invokes many different thoughts for me. The many supervisors I have had, and the many people I have supervised. And the formality of the word. I got a bit stuck when trying to move past this, so I read through multiple blog posts about having one’s communication shaped, ‘therapyed’ or embraced. These posts brought to my mind the way that we as Speech and Language Therapists (SLTs) advocate for all of this communication, in whatever form is successful or possible for each individual, yet when it comes to shaping my own supervision, the same rules just don’t apply. I turn up to therapy sessions with clients. But at times, have found it hard to access my own unique communication space (which will help in those therapy sessions I turn up to), why is that? We want our accountants to be au fait with current tax law, our mechanics to put the right parts in our car, yet for some reason there are times when we turn up to sessions not having invested in our knowledge space, which is essential to providing therapy. Why do we not seek it out if we don’t have what we need or want?

Reasons I have not accessed supervision include that I have worked outside of the NHS and just haven’t got round to getting any, I have had managers who haven’t seen its benefits (I have also had managers who have ‘over-supervised’!), and I have had supervisors where their style of supervision is just not my cup of tea. There have also been times when I’ve not been linked into a neat network of Speech and Language Therapists. At times I have craved this ‘simple’ structure of one senior SLT supervises me, and then I supervise an SLT below me. But currently that isn’t an option available to me. I am an overseas trained SLT, who has spent some time as a permanent staff member in the NHS, a wee stint working privately and am currently working as a locum in the NHS. My life is soon changing as I am looking to return home.

Right now, I am lucky, especially as a locum. I have regular supervision. I also give regular supervision. I have a clinical team leader (CTL) who is not an SLT, but who always has an open ear, and filing cabinet full of ideas, especially around complex issues such as safeguarding and setting up a service. But, we have both wondered on occasion, if she was an SLT, would we come up with the answer to a curly clinical quandary more quickly?

I also have, until recently, received private supervision from an SLT. On writing this I reflected about what brought me to private supervision, and it struck me that I was looking for that ‘simple’ hierarchical structure that I mentioned above. However, what came out was something different. I had the freedom to discuss anything as my supervisor was able to look at my thoughts and issues through a different lens, removed from the need to be managerial. Someone who was intrigued to help me find the balance in relationships, who did not have a stake in the outcome and, therefore, was able to challenge me in order to help me create boundaries within my work. In her removed position, she was able to help me understand what areas to drive forward clinically. However, this separation from my day-to-day work existence, meant at times I would need to go back to my CTL to float the ideas discussed.

It took me a while to access private clinical supervision. I would often go to my sessions with the anxiety that one has when the ‘to do’ list takes up three sides of paper. But when I would leave it was like a weight had been lifted off my shoulders – the exact same feeling that I have when I meet with my CTL. Although both of my supervisors are interested in serving the same purpose – making sure I don’t burn out – they come at it from differing perspectives.

The biggest thing I will be taking from my recent supervision experience is that it is all about relationships. The relationship with the supervisor and myself, but mostly the content of discussion is how I am relating to others. I have sated my need for the neat little SLT supervision structure. It is not a necessity to be supervised by your own discipline or receive clinical support from your own workplace. A perfectly excellent job can be achieved outside of these arrangements, as long as your supervisor knows what kinds of questions to ask, and is humble enough to say “Hmmm, is this what that looks like? If not, tell me more…” I can feel myself now asking similar-structured questions to the Occupational Therapists and Physiotherapists, who ask me how they should manage a particular situation. I pride myself on my ability to relate to my colleagues, clients and wider community as an SLT, but I need to leave my guilt at the supervision door because if I am not showing up to my own unique communication space then the relationships in my work just won’t work.

Anna Childs (nee Wivell)

Totally OK to Stammer at Work (2/2)

Iain smile photoMartyn: “Do you ever read poetry?”

Me : “No. Of course not.”

Martyn: “You might try it sometime. David Whyte1, something like that.”

It had been just a short conversation but, as usual, his intuition was spot on.

I’d been discussing with Martyn Brown, my Executive Coach at Ashridge2, my progress towards becoming more of myself at work, including being more open about my stammer.

But poetry, that was a weird one. I was curious.

Fast forward 5 years and here I am gratefully responding to an invitation from intandem to write about how poetry has helped me to forge a much healthier relationship with my stammer. In last month’s blog post I wrote how the Employers Stammering Network3 is aiming to make it “Totally OK to stammer at work”, whereas this article is shaped more towards my own personal journey.

Over recent years, I’ve used my experience of many years in business to confront a series of questions that I wish I’d known the answers to at the start of my career.

And nowadays, I wonder what advice I’d offer to my younger self if he asked me these questions – and, to help his imagination, what lines of poetry might I even share with him? Here’s how our Q&A session might sound:

Q 1 How much will my stammer restrict my career?

A 1: It may surprise you, because you feel so ashamed when sometimes you can’t even say your own name, but the answer rests almost entirely within your own control. Your stammer can dominate your career or it can be almost completely irrelevant. Truly!

For me the big realisation was that it was within my gift to choose how I saw myself with a stammer – either as someone who’s shame and self-oppression for having a stammer would continue all my life – or as someone who could accept over time that it’s “totally OK for me to stammer – even at work”.

That’s so easy to write, yet it took me years to get here. And one of the steps helping along the way was learning that by living more choice-fully in relation to my stammer, I could influence for better or worse the outcomes for my own career. This point about consciously making difficult choices lies at the heart of the closing lines of Robert Frost’s ‘The Road Not Taken’:

 

THE ROAD NOT TAKEN (Extract)4

Robert Frost

 

“I shall be telling this with a sigh

Somewhere ages and ages hence:

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I –

I took the one less travelled by,

And that has made all the difference.”

 

Q 2 : How will I ever become more comfortable with speaking in public?

A 2: For people who stammer, speaking in public is often a step too far – and we avoid it at all costs.

Throughout my career, my relationship with speaking up has been erratic to say the least! My progress has come from taking calculated risks, some successful and others not – but doing it in my own way for better or worse. Stubborn, you might call it. I prefer to call it courageous!

It’s not been easy at all – but it’s definitely been worth it.

This sometimes unbearably difficult path of making changes in mid-life is a core theme of some of David Whyte’s work, and it’s almost as if ‘Start Close In’ was written with the courageous step of speaking up in public for the first time in mind .

 

START CLOSE IN (Extract)5

David Whyte

 

“Start Close in

Don’t take the second step

or the third

start with the first

thing,

close in,

the step

you don’t want to take.

 

Start with

the ground

you know,

the pale ground

beneath your feet

your own

way of starting

the conversation.”

 

Q3: How can I cope when I’m having a bad day with my stammer?

A 3: Some days are just difficult stammering days. You’re tired, nervous or slightly out of sorts – that’s life.

And yes, there’s still pressure not to stammer at work and, even though I’ve learnt to rise above it, it can still feel bruising when it’s been a tough stammering day.

Learning self-acceptance, resilience and perspective has been crucial to coping with those days. Like Derek Walcott’s raw realisation in “Love after Love”, it’s meant looking in the mirror and accepting myself. Accepting that my stammer has always been part of me – and not to try to make it a stranger.

 

LOVE AFTER LOVE (Extract)6

Derek Walcott

 

The time will come

when, with elation,

you will greet yourself arriving

at your own door, in your own mirror,

and each will smile at the other’s welcome,

and say, sit here. Eat.

You will love again the stranger who was yourself.”

 

Q4: Where can I find advice, support and kindred spirits?

A4: Nowadays there is so much support and friendship out here for people who stammer.

Firstly, I’d point towards the British Stammering Association7 (“BSA”) the national charity for people in the UK who stammer.

And secondly to our Employers Stammering Network, an arm of the BSA, where our goal is simply to make it “Totally OK to Stammer at Work”. Don’t worry, we never discuss poetry, that’s just me!

Both the BSA and ESN offer a spirit of welcome – from people who stammer – that’s warm and genuine. Just visit the BSA Closed Facebook group to get a feel for it.

Which brings me to my final poem, from David Whyte’s recent collection ‘Pilgrim’, which develops the theme of arriving amongst strangers who themselves have walked a similar, searching journey.

 

CAMINO (Extract)8

David Whyte

 

“…….other people

seemed to know you even before you gave up

being a shadow on the road and came into the light,

even before you sat down with them,

broke bread and drank wine,

wiped the wind-tears from your eyes:

pilgrim they called you again. Pilgrim.”

 

Before ending, I have an invitation for you.

Please start a conversation with someone about how it’s “Totally OK to Stammer at Work”. You might choose a friend, a colleague, perhaps your boss.

Every conversation is an important step forward in improving workplace culture towards stammering – and if you’re stuck for how to start, you will surely find inspiration in the opening lines of ‘Start Close In’ above…….

I’m keen to hear how you get on!

poetry wordle

Iain Wilkie

Iain Wilkie is a Senior Partner at EY and the Co-Chairman of the Employers Stammering Network (“ESN”). All views and opinions expressed in this article are entirely his own.

 

References

1. David Whyte – Poet, author, lecturer. www.davidwhyte.com

2. Martyn Brown – Business Director, Organisational and Executive Development, Ashridge Business School, and Ashridge Programme Leader for EY.

3. Employers Stammering Network is operated by the British Stammering Association (see 6 below). For further information contact please email either iwilkie@uk.ey.com or Norbert Lieckfeldt at esn@stammering.org or mail@esn.org.uk

4. “The poetry of Robert Frost”, ed Edward Connery Lathem (Jonathan Cape 1967), Random House Ltd, 20 Vauxhall Bridge Road, London SW1V 2SA. “Staying Alive”, edited by Neil Astley, 2002, Bloodaxe Books Ltd, Highgreen, Torset, Northumberland, NE48 1RP.

5. David Whyte, “River Flow”, New & Selected poems 1984-2007. Many Rivers Press, P O Box 868, Langley, WA 98260, USA. www.davidwhyte.com © David Whyte.

6. Roger Housden 2003 “Ten poems to change your life”, Hodder & Stoughton, 338 Euston Road, London NW1 3BH, UK. Farrar, Straws and Giroux LLC, Collected Poems of Derek Walcott, 1996. © Derek Walcott.

7. British Stammering Association, 15 Old Ford Road, London E2 9PJ. For information contact www.stammering.org or 020 -8983 1003 or nl@stammering.org.

8. “Pilgrim – poems by David Whyte, 2012”. Many Rivers Press, P O Box 868, Langley, WA 98260, USA. www.davidwhyte.com. © David Whyte 2012.

Yoga and Brain Injury

Mail AttachmentI have never written a blog before, but the invitation to do so is a timely one as I ‘grow up’ and find my way with social media on my freelance ‘adventure’. Since I took early retirement from my role supporting people with Creutzfeld Jacob Disease (CJD) and their families in the NHS, my goal has been to develop all the different aspects of my work and life that I am passionate about, and link them in a coherent ‘whole’.

Working with a person’s experience of cognitive impairment, living with the risk of an inherited dementia, my family, travel, yoga …. and my travelling companion Personal Construct Psychology (PCP) are the key things I knew I wanted to be part of this new phase of my life. I worried about keeping focused without the structure of a job to go to in order to keep focused, so with the luxury of now being able to make my own timetable, I went to an early morning yoga class three times a week.

I started to elaborate my sense that yoga could bring relief for my clients living with cognitive impairment. I undertook yoga therapy training for people working with children with special needs with Jo Manuel at the Special Yoga Centre, and started to engage one of my elderly clients in a gentle yoga practice. It is striking how she can remember movements and postures from the previous week, whilst she is unable to remember what has been said just five minutes beforehand. This in itself is a major opportunity for validation in people with cognitive impairment, the critical essence of person-centred interventions, however yoga has a great deal to offer people with brain injury on many levels: rehabilitation, health and well being, managing cognitive impairment and emotional consequences of brain injury.

A year of weekly yoga therapy with a woman who was bed bound following three strokes and diagnosis of dementia, with neurogenic pain and deemed unsuitable for rehabilitation, is now moving herself around her bed, up to sitting, transferring without the use of a hoist. She is also now able to discuss the nature of her difficulties and articulate the changes she experiences in her body. The role of yoga in rehabilitation, promoting and maintaining mobility, breaking down the goals into small and manageable steps for people with neurological challenges and cognitive impairment has huge potential, not least because of its focus on awareness.

Peter Blackaby (2014) explains how it is feeling movement that brings about learning (sensory motor cortex), and not ‘telling’ our muscles to move (motor cortex). He quotes a study where monkeys have had the motor cortex for a skilled movement removed from their brain and yet can still make that same skilled movement. Another part of the brain takes over. However, when the sensory motor cortex is removed for that same skilled movement, the movement can no longer be made at all. Critically it is the noticing involved in the practice of yoga that brings about change in body and mind.

Yoga is well known for the links between mind & body, and yoga practice is in fact a physical and tangible route to achieving a state of meditation, which has evidence based health benefits in generating the opposite of the stress response in the body. There is increasing evidence for change in circulatory, emotional and mental health, in addition to changes at a cellular level in people who are recovering from cancer. From a psychotherapeutic perspective, yoga is also a way of working with the aspects of ourselves that are not easily put into words, and may never even be articulated. In this way yoga brings therapeutic intervention within reach of people with severe communication disorders.

I have been elaborating this idea from the perspective of PCP. Our theories about the world around us exist at all levels of awareness, and while psychotherapy might advocate that its role is to help people articulate their construing at lower levels of awareness, I personally wonder whether that is always necessary for change and wellbeing? In PCP we see words as merely what we use to convey our discriminations and conclusions about the world around us, and there will always be much of our construing that remains inaccessible… that part of our construing which is non-verbal, intuitive, or was developed before spoken language. Yoga enables us to experiment and elaborate ourselves at that nonverbal level and so is it surprising that the practice of yoga brings about changes in our thinking and our emotions?

There are many different forms of yoga, and increasing research evidence for the health benefits of yoga in general, and for yogic breathing techniques and mindfulness in particular. For me, I am interested in what all yoga has in common rather than a specific approach, and its contribution in the process of achieving and practising mindfulness, with a view to developing yoga as a therapeutic intervention with people with dementia and other forms of brain injury.

I am currently taking referrals for one to one work and I go into residential and day care facilities. l now look forward to teaching the first 25 hour yoga training for people living or working with people with dementia and other forms of brain injury in March 2015 at Special Yoga in London. It’s a course for family members interested in exploring ways to engage with their relatives with brain injury, for health professionals interested in the application of yoga with people with brain injury, and for yoga teachers and practitioners wanting to understand more about the experience of cognitive impairment, whether this is stable and resolving, or progressive and/or fluctuating. The flyer can be found at http://specialyoga.org.uk/teacher_training/yoga_dementia/ or you can contact me directly.

Clare Morris
07545 287139
clrmrrs@me.com
www.claremorris.org.uk
@ClareMorrisPCP

Collaboration

“Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress, and working together is success” Henry Ford

2014 marks intandem‘s 10-year anniversary. Throughout this time, collaboration has been at the heart of all our work – both with each other and with others. 2013 was a year of experiments and we worked hard to establish even more connections and links within and outside our professional groups, using a range of approaches. As a result our networks and those we have reached and influenced have increased considerably. Here are some highlights from 2013 and some aspirations for 2014…

Twitter: @_intandem
One of our new ventures in 2013 was setting up a twitter account. We have written over 100 tweets and now have over 70 followers – including clients, therapists, counsellors, researchers, organisations, charities, students, and projects. We are using twitter to let people know what we are up to as well as signposting other events and ideas. Twitter offers a different way of interacting with individuals and groups and one that we hope we are getting better at with practice. We are starting to build a community of collaborators, which we consider a positive way forward.

Blog: www.intandem.co.uk/blog
2013 also saw the start of our monthly blog. Together with a range of guest bloggers, we have been able to use this as a regular platform to share ideas, reflections and insights as well as to signpost projects. Topics have included: different group experiences, vulnerability, acceptance, community & celebration, supervision and last, but not least, the launch of Stammering Therapy from the Inside: New Perspectives on Working with Young People and Adults. We have had a very positive response to each blog post and look forward to welcoming a range of new collaborators throughout 2014. Watch this space!

Culture Club
Another new intandem project for 2013 involved setting up a group opportunity for people with experience of stroke, tumour, head injury or brain surgery who are interested in music, film, theatre, comedy and art (Read here for more information). This open group of men and women meet every two months in the comfort of a local hotel café. Feedback to date has been resoundingly positive with a shared enjoyment of events, new ideas, humour and support. We plan to continue with this group throughout 2014 – check out the dates on our website here.

Relationship Group
Working with young people with experience of brain injury, who want to develop new friendships and relationships, has brought intandem to experimenting with a new group. We are looking forward to collaborating with Flame Introductions, a personal introduction agency who specialise in supporting people with mild disabilities and who you may have seen on the TV programme The Undateables. Our first joint meeting will be in March. Do get in touch if you are interested, as we are keen to open this group up to others.

Stammering Open Space
This open group has gone from strength to strength over the course of 2013 and now has a well-established core membership. (Read here for more information). Again feedback has been highly positive with a shared appreciation of the support and challenge, lively debate and exchange of ideas that the group offers. 2014 dates can be found here.

Courses
In our continued attempt to raise the profile of supervision within the profession we ran regular RCSLT registered Supervision 1 & 2 courses in England and Wales throughout the year. 2013 also saw us collaborating with UCL to offer a bespoke supervision course for new graduates. We recognise the unique needs of those entering the profession in the current climate. Through the course, we aimed to equip the students with the knowledge and skills to reach out for good support and supervision throughout their careers. Our shared commitment to offering support and training to therapists, coaches and other healthcare professionals interested in developing their counselling skills, resulted in our running a number of training days across the year, both independently and in collaboration with the Personal Construct Psychology Association and City Lit. intandem was also involved in organising a day of talks at City Lit to mark the publication of ‘Stammering Therapy from the Inside’, as well as co-ordinating a local book launch. Our 2014 programme of courses can be found here. Do check out what is new and let us know if you are interested in taking part.

We have enjoyed a year of experimentation and collaboration. Thanks to everyone we have worked with and met along the way! Here’s to 2014 – as we reach out to new possibilities ahead.

Cathy & Sam
January 2014

The Stammering Open Space

I’d been to see Sam a few times before she introduced the idea of a group session. At first I was sceptical, after all I’d been trying to hide my stammer from everyone: family, friends, colleagues etc. so why would I want to be in a situation with people I didn’t know and be open about having a speech problem? Well that turned out to be exactly the point: the opportunity to be in a safe & non-judging environment, where I didn’t have to try to hide it!

The moment I arrived I was happy that I’d had the courage to attend – the session completely exceeded expectations and was actually good fun and a lot of laughs. The other guys were a lot like me, which was the biggest surprise of all. Everyone was open, honest and going through the same things, which made me realise that I wasn’t actually alone in any of this – and that’s really encouraging. We all have varying degrees of stammering and each of us different aspects we struggle with. Listening to everyone’s experiences and how they deal with their speech has definitely helped me overcome some of my obstacles and has made the whole process of speaking that much easier. Being able to share, push the boundaries and experience something new in a group environment is incredibly beneficial and I’d encourage everyone to try it at least once. And of course, did I mention the superb tea, coffee and biscuits that are on offer as well…?

See you at the next Open Space, cheers.

Joe

intandem’s first blog!

Welcome to intandem’s first blog!

It is a testimony to how far we have come since we first entered the independent sector 8 years ago – and the advance of social media!

We have embarked on 2013 with setting up a Twitter account @_intandem. Through it we hope to develop a community of like-minded people – colleagues, clients, family members, students – in order to open up a dialogue about topics close to our hearts. We are also very keen to create forums, debates and share knowledge with people we know and people we have not reached before.

In the spirit of experimentation, we are starting 2013 with a number of new ventures relevant to both professionals and clients.

  • Raising the profile of supervision within the profession is high on our agenda for the year. Having been commissioned by the Association for Speech and Language Therapists in Independent Practice to update the supervision section on their website, this has now gone live for members. Do have a look and let us know what you think.
  • Our article on the newly revised RCSLT supervision guidelines in the RCSLT Bulletin is also just out. We very much enjoyed this opportunity to share our thoughts on supervision more publically and have been pleasantly surprised by the number of positive comments we have already received. Several therapists are planning to use the article as a springboard for discussions with their managers about the adequacy of their supervisory relationships and as a vehicle to help change attitudes towards supervision within their departments. We wish them all well.

Do get in touch if you have a view on supervision in the current climate or the 2012 RCSLT supervision guidelines. We would also love to hear from you if you are interested in getting involved in setting up training opportunities and supervision networks in your area.

Some of our clients have been avidly followly the latest series of The Undateables, a programme recently shown on Channel 4 . The first episode featured a young woman with aphasia, which has promoted a lot of interesting discussions around the opportunities and challenges of meeting new people and beginning new friendships.

We start 2013 with two new group ventures for people with experience of brain injury:

  • The first is a bi-monthly Culture Club which will offer an opportunity to meet and share ideas with others interested in music, film, theatre, comedy and art. Our first event is on 5th March 2013 if you are free.
  • The second is a new group forum for people who specifically want to address issues around dating and relationships. We are beginning to gather together the names of people who are interested in meeting up for an exploratory session.

Do get in touch if you are interested in either group. Contact: info@intandem.co.uk

That’s it for this month. We very much look forward to hearing from you.

Here’s to an exciting 2013 full of tweets and hashtags!

Cathy and Sam