Tag Archives: Theory

Talking Mats in Practice

Following on from my last blog introducing my journey with Talking Mats (TMs), I have described below two examples of my use of TMs in practice. I specialise in working with people who have had sudden onset brain disorders, such as strokes, brain injuries and other progressive brain disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease and dementia. I work in a rehabilitation hospital where we provide a service to the elderly and to a neurological rehabilitation unit.

Talking Mats has been an invaluable picture communication tool to facilitate communication with people who present with cognitive (thinking, memory) and/or communication (talking) skills as described in the examples below:

The first example of TMs shows how it can be used to get to know someone and find out what their hobbies and interests are.

This is Bob’s Talking Mat:
Topic: Indoors activities – likes and dislikes
Bob (*name changed) had a large stroke that affected the left side of his brain. This affected his thinking and talking skills. It also affected his walking and he was using a wheelchair in hospital. Bob found it difficult to engage in conversation. The Physiotherapist and I thought that TMs may be a way to help Bob tell us about himself. We also wanted to see how he responded to using TMs to see if this would help him to think about some goals.

We started with symbols that Bob would find easiest to understand, so we explored Bob’s hobbies. The topic we picked was ‘indoor hobbies’ – this was placed at the bottom of the mat. We asked Bob how he felt about different indoor hobbies encouraging Bob to place the pictures on the mat. Using a visual scale of like/so-so/dislike at the top of the mat, Bob told us he liked music, TV, snacks, and card games. He disliked reading, arts and crafts. He felt ‘so-so’ about pets, computers, chatting, cleaning, cooking, photographs, and relaxing. Using the information in his ‘All about me’ book filled out by his family and talking to Bob more about his likes, in particular music and TV, I was able to incorporate his music choices in our music group. Bob became very vocal in the music group, happily singing away to his favourite band! Bob enjoyed TMs and it was used successfully to help Bob set his goals. The picture symbols also helped Bob’s thinking, understanding and talking. The visual framework of his hobbies allowed him time to think, process and respond.

This is Ruby’s Talking Mat:
Topic: Management of domestic life
 Ruby (*name changed), a 92 year old, was admitted to hospital with dementia following a fall resulting in a fractured hip. She lived on her own with some help from carers. As a result of her dementia, her thinking and memory were affected. The dementia also caused her to muddle her words and she would talk about her pet ‘penguin’ meaning her ‘parrot’.

The hospital team were worried that Ruby may not manage at home on discharge from hospital and that she may not fully understand the risks if she chose to go home. The Occupational Therapist and I used TMs with Ruby to look at how she felt about managing her self-care and domestic life at home. Ruby was engaged in TMs, but it became apparent that her insight and awareness was impaired. For example, Ruby forgot she had carers to visit her and that her meals were prepared for her by the carers. The hospital team were also concerned about Ruby during the night as she needed help in the hospital to get to the toilet and she would not be able to do this without help at home.

The Social Worker and I worked together with Ruby using TMs to look at her capacity to make an informed choice about her discharge destination. According to the Mental Capacity Act, “individuals must be given help to make a decision themselves. This might include, for example, providing the person with information in a format that is easier for them to understand”.

We carried out TMs as shown in the picture above. The topic, ‘domestic life’, was placed at the bottom of the mat. The top scale at the top of the mat, ‘easy’ was placed in the left hand corner; ‘so-so’ in the middle and ‘difficult’ in the top right hand corner. Ruby felt that cooking, paying her bills, cleaning, shopping, laundry and money were difficult. She felt unsure about being able to make a snack and there was nothing she found easy. When we asked her if she wanted to add anything else to her mat, she said that she was worried about ‘somebody ringing the bell’; ‘falling over’; night-time – ‘being alone’.

The Social Worker and I carried out a ‘sub-mat’ to explore with Ruby other options regarding discharge from hospital. It was felt, given the level of her care needs in hospital, that a nursing home might be the safest option.

Sub-mat exploring discharge destination options including nursing home:
Topic: Nursing home positives and negatives
 The topic placed at the bottom of the mat was ‘nursing home’. The symbol options on the previous mat that Ruby felt were ‘difficult’ were used for the sub-mat. The top scale for this mat was ‘like’, in the top left hand corner, ‘so-so’ placed in the top middle and ‘dislike’ in the top right hand corner of the mat.

Ruby put the ‘eating’ symbol under ‘like’ as it meant to her that her meals would be provided and that she would be eating with others at mealtimes if she chose to. She liked that her laundry would be done for her, and she liked the fact that she would not have to worry about the shopping, cleaning and cooking, as this would all be taken care of by the nursing home. We discussed the concerns that she had about people ringing the bell at home and that she would not be alone at night time.

We gave Ruby a copy of her TM so that she could think about what we had discussed together. A few days later, Ruby called over the SLT and Social Worker on separate occasions when sitting in the ward dining room and said she was keen to ‘get going and look at nursing homes’. I felt that the visual framework of TMs had helped support her thinking, memory and understanding. It gave Ruby ‘thinking space’ to add her concerns of ‘someone ringing the bell’, and ‘being alone’ at night. The mats showed Ruby’s problem solving, such as her difficulties at home versus the benefits of a nursing home. The Social Worker and I felt that Ruby had capacity to make an informed decision regarding where she wanted to be discharged to from hospital. I am pleased to say that Ruby was very happily ensconced in a nursing home chosen by herself and her family.

Leila Paxton

For more information about this blog and foundation training (TMs beginners) please contact me via:
Email: leilapaxton@hotmail.com
Twitter: @leilapaxton

 

 

 

Power, professionals, privilege and person-centredness…

DSC01389_lightAs an allied health professional and educator in the health and social care sector, I interview a lot of would-be health and social care professionals. Almost without fail, these university applicants talk about caring and their desire to work with people, of communication skills and understanding. In due course the successful students study hard to achieve their professional registration. The academic Caroline Ellis-Hills and her team have written that rehabilitation is about helping people to live a life not dominated by their disability; a shift from the traditional medical ‘fix-it’ models. With professional registration comes the opportunity to use newly acquired knowledge to support people to live such lives. This privileged opportunity is one of both position and potential power.  In policy, education and as health and social care professionals, we talk about being ‘patient-centred’; in reality and borne out in the research literature, we may be falling short in this aspect of our practice. It is my observation that many therapists, including me, readily slip into a ‘gift’ model of rehabilitation; one where as a product of our knowledge, we tend to hold the power and suggest what is best in the light of available evidence. As a result we tend to dominate and drive rehabilitation and in turn lose sight of the person at the centre. Again the research literature reflects this. For some years now, William Levack and his colleagues have looked in detail at what happens in goal setting; a central tenet of rehabilitation practice. They have observed that while therapists talk about person-centredness and empowerment, when there is disagreement between patients and teams about which goals to set, patient preferences seem to get lost. Regrettably, I recognise my own practice in Levack’s observation of therapists steering a patient to set less ambitious, more realistic goals; a goal Levack and his colleagues call a ‘privileged goal’. In the past I have rationalised this as therapeutic, avoiding raising unrealistic expectations and supporting the development of insight, but I am increasingly ill-at-ease with this element of practice and it is fast joining my list of behaviours and practices to eliminate in rehabilitation along with the over used and thinly considered phrase: ‘no rehab’ potential’. Furthermore, I’m asking myself (and my students), what’s the more normal behaviour; setting a realistic goal or setting an unrealistic goal? Hands-up …. I set a lot of unrealistic goals … for myself, over and over again …. so, I don’t really demonstrate very good learning either. Is this a health condition?

It’s reassuring that the research literature is documenting these phenomena and encouraging practitioners to think about practices that have become so embedded that we have ceased to examine what is really happening in these powerful interactions. However, notwithstanding the contribution of evidence based practice in recent years, we need to be wary of being too dependent on the research literature. For me, the most powerful prompt to re-evaluate my practice came from two ad hoc personal interactions. The first with a social work colleague who many years ago told me: ‘when someone is told they have ‘no rehab’ potential’, they feel like they have scored ‘null points’ for life’. The second was hearing the experiences of my school friend’s husband, David. David had an aggressive brain tumour in 2005, (http://www.braintumourresearch.org/david-grant_725 ). When diagnosed he was told his life expectancy was about 15 months. A decade later, David is still here. He’s only recently retired from fulltime work and remains both independent and active, contributing to student education, cancer charity and policy work.

When I first heard David talking about his goals I remember worrying that he lacked insight about the gravity of his condition. David’s goals were big, ambitious and emotionally laden; things like, ‘I’m going to walk my daughter to school on her first day at school’. As a friend, I struggled with how to react. I felt empathy for any therapists who might have been trying to rein him in and recalibrate his expectations. Actually, it was me who had to recalibrate; David did not and does not lack insight. He is absolutely realistic about the gravity of his condition, but this does not mean he cannot also be active and hopeful. The importance of supporting and nurturing hope features little in health and social care education but is an area gathering attention. Returning to the research for a moment, there’s evidence that, just like David, patients can remain hopeful but equally grasp the seriousness of their condition. Bright and her colleagues reviewed the literature about hope in relation to stroke and suggest that while there’s some evidence that health and social care professionals can have a positive role in fostering hope, they are just as likely to dash hopes, to justify this as setting realistic expectations and what’s more, seldom see fostering hope as their role.

Clearly there is a balance to be struck, but I have always thought that there is huge merit in the phrase David recalls his oncologist using: ‘David, you have a very nasty brain tumour, but a small minority of people do very well; join them!’. After all, how do the health and social care professionals ‘know’ what a realistic expectation is?  For a couple of decades now we have been encouraged to look at the evidence, the statistics and empirical research; to embrace evidence based practice. There is of course value in such evidence, but it doesn’t tell us the whole story. David, for example, is excluded from brain tumour survivor research because …… well, he’s survived too long! The occupational therapist and writer in the field of rehabilitation, Karen Whalley Hammel, encourages us to tease apart the ties between knowledge and power. As far back as 1999, Coulter wrote in the British Medical Journal: ‘….while the professional is knowledgeable about the individual’s condition, only service users and carers know about their experiences, circumstances, habits, preferences and values; the partnership approach to care should be based on mutual respect.’ There are echoes here of George Kelly’s characterisation of two experts in the room. A decade and a half later we still talk about patient-centredness as if it is a new concept and campaigns such as Kate Granger’s (http://hellomynameis.org.uk/), suggest there is still a way to go and that there are small things that can make an enormous difference.

I’m encouraged that increasingly I see issues of hope and person-focus thoughtfully discussed by both therapists in training and those more established in practice and I find myself thinking: ‘Is an experienced practitioner the one with the most up-to-date disease-specific research knowledge or the wise one, open to possibility, practising their craft with care and respect and above all with a focus on the individual?’

Deborah Harding
Senior Lecturer, Rehabilitation
Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences
St George’s, University of London
Email: d.harding@sgul.kingston.ac.uk
Twitter: @HardingDebs

Sadly – not all academic journals are open access yet, but for those who are interested here are the references for any literature I have cited:

Bright, F.A.S., Kayes, N.M., McCann, C.M. and McPherson, K.M. (2011) Understanding hope after stroke: A systematic review of the literature using concept analysis.  Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation. 18(5): 490-508

Coulter, A. (1999) Paternalism or partnership? Patients have grown up – and there’s no going back. British Medical Journal, 3 19: 719–20

Ellis-Hills, C., Payne, S. And Ward, C. (2008) Using stroke to explore the Life Thread Model: An alternative approach to understanding rehabilitation following an acquired disability. Disability and Rehabilitation, 30(2): 150-159

Kelly, G. (1963) A theory of personality: The psychology of personal constructs. New York : Norton

Levack, W., Dean, S.G., Siegert, R.J. & McPherson, K.M. (2011) ‘Navigating patient-centred goal setting in inpatient stroke rehabilitation: How clinicians control the process to meet perceived professional responsibilities’, Patient Education and Counseling. 85(2): 206-213

Whalley Hammel, K., (2006) Perspectives on Disability and Rehabilitation: contesting assumptions; challenging practice. London: Churchill Livingston

Living with a communication disability: insider accounts

image001 ‘Nothing ever becomes real till it is experienced’
John Keats
One of the greatest challenges in acquiring any new skill is taking the knowledge you have gained and applying it to the real world in a meaningful and positive way. Bridging the gap between theory and experience is something I, as a student speech and language therapist, have had to contend with. Speech and language therapists work with a wide range of clients at various stages of their lives and recovery, and whilst training there are limits on the range of clients you are able to work with due to various factors, such as timing and placement provision. The reality of being a newly qualified speech and language therapist is being faced with client groups that you have no previous experience of working with. Although you have the theoretical knowledge and transferable skills this prospect can feel daunting.

Sam Simpson and Cathy Sparkes have recognised the importance of learning through experience and how talking to people with a communication disability can enhance the developing skills of student speech and language therapists. ‘Living with a communication disability: insider accounts’ was one of a series of lectures Sam and Cathy gave to speech and language therapy students at University College London this year. It provided an open forum for students to meet clients with a range of communication disabilities, to hear their stories and ask them questions. This experience differed from meeting clients in a placement setting as our role was not to assess, provide therapy or to advise them, but to listen to their personal narrative and use their experience to reflect on our practice as speech and language therapists in training.

Clients sharing their stories in an open and honest way made me reflect on the extent to which communication disability impacts a person’s life. What stood out to me were how the clients’ communication difficulties impacted their identity and role within society. Examples included difficulties returning to their previous occupation and maintaining social networks and relationships. Viewing the client holistically has been embedded into our training, but I believe meeting clients and hearing their first-hand accounts has made me reflect on my perception of what speech and language therapy can offer. As a student I am guilty often of getting overwhelmed with theory and the process of therapy, which can narrow my view of the client. This experience has taught me to view every client I meet holistically and to consider the wide-ranging and varied impact a communication disability can have on an individual. I hope to carry this experience with me beyond my training into my clinical work as a constant reminder of the importance of the person at the centre of the communication disability.

Lindsey Beer

Living well with stuttering

To celebrate International Stuttering Awareness Day on Tuesday 22 October 2013, Selena Donaldson, speech and language therapist for The Fluency Network at The University of Auckland hosted an informative breakfast seminar. This seminar featured a pre-recorded question and answer session with Sam Simpson and Rachel Everard, two of the co-authors of ‘Stammering Therapy From the Inside’. This event marked the opening of The Fluency Network at The University of Auckland, New Zealand’s newest service for people who
stammer.

Sam and Rachel introduced the concept of ‘living well with stuttering’. They discussed the idea of therapy supporting living with stuttering in a more comfortable way and deconstructed the common misconception that stuttering is something that has to be ‘fixed’. Sam and Rachel acknowledged that there is a range of approaches to stuttering therapy, and that the therapy process parallels a journey, in which a person may try different things at different points in life. They emphasised the importance of being transparent with clients about the type of approach taken, and the theoretical base behind it. Rachel stated from her own personal experience of stammering that although there are useful fluency shaping techniques available, those techniques can be difficult to apply in practice, unless the person becomes more open and accepting of their stuttering.

During this seminar, Sam and Rachel also spoke of self-disclosure. They emphasised the importance of not viewing stuttering as something that needs to be hidden, and promoted the value of stuttering being acknowledged by family and friends. They also emphasised the speech and language therapists’ role in offering clients a flexible model of therapy to help clients on their journey towards self-acceptance. These were concepts I have recently explored with a client at the University of Auckland Fluency Network Clinic. My client was interested in fluency shaping and the freedom approach to stuttering as well. Self-disclosure proved to be a highly powerful tool for this client, who was initially apprehensive about self-advertising and voluntary stuttering due to his past negative experiences. Having independently decided to self-disclose in a group situation outside of the therapy environment, he reported the experience to have been positive, stating, “the stutter doesn’t define me”.

It was wonderful to hear from Sam and Rachel, across the world, on International Stuttering Awareness Day, and to open the University’s new service with their astute and holistic clinical reflections.

Irene Yap
Master of Speech Language Therapy (Practice), final year student
The University of Auckland